Ekka's not just all fun for Jordan

21 May 2013

Jordan Carroll of Brisbane has just been paired with his first ever seeing eye dog, Ekka.  At just 16 years old, Jordan is Queensland’s youngest SEDA client and has already felt an increased sense of independence and freedom. 

Jordan has a brain tumour which impacts on his vision- he has no peripheral vision in both eyes and has lost nearly all vision in his left eye, while he retains just 25% in his right eye.

The tumour was discovered after Jordan suffered a stroke at just 11 years old. He was placed in an induced coma and doctors gave him a 3% chance of survival, predicting that if he were to survive, it would be likely that he would have brain damage. 

Against the odds Jordan awoke, but to a grim diagnosis: not only did he have a brain tumour that would affect his short-term memory, it would also cause his vision to deteriorate because it was crushing on his optic nerves.  

Currently, Jordan’s brain tumour affects his short term memory in his day to day life and he often cannot remember if he has been at school- after attending just hours before. 

Since April, Ekka and Jordan have become fast friends and Ekka helps Jordan navigate through his daily life, while providing him comfort , especially when he attends his radiation therapy 5 times a week.   His parents Marie and Andrew Carroll have seen a newfound confidence in their son and are delighted at the positive affect that Ekka has had on Jordan.  

They are so grateful to SEDA for giving their son a new lease on life and for matching him with a Seeing Eye Dog-despite his medical conditions. The team at SEDA worked tirelessly with Jordan because of his short term memory loss, so that he could work safely with Ekka.  SEDA believe that every person who is blind or has low vision is entitled access to a seeing eye dog, and to refuse a person of this right is to deny them a better quality of life. This is what sets them apart from the other organisations. 

SEDA wouldn’t be able to give Jordan a seeing eye dog if it weren’t for the amazing puppy carers that volunteer their time to raise a puppy till they are 12 months old. Their support is vital to the ongoing success of this organisation and SEDA is currently facing a shortage of puppy carers and is in desperate need of more carers so there can be many more happy stories, just like young Jordan.